Lost Perth

Have you seen Perth’s latest craze on Facebook? Lost Perth is a page that attempts to uncover all the “lost” and “forgotten” photographs and memories of Perth.

The page was started by Warren Duffy less than 4 weeks ago and already has a whopping 54+ thousand “likes”.

An old scene from South Perth is currently featured on the page’s cover photo…
(Can you guess where that is? click on the image below for the answer)

Lost-Perth

And there have been other interesting photographs of South Perth’s history posted every few days.

Here are links to a few of them…

The Lost Perth page isn’t just interesting to us South Perthians however. This page will dredge up long forgotten memories from all over Perth. Read through the hundreds of comments and join the discussion and reminisce over the days gone by.

Seen or heard something interesting? Share it with us!

Advertisements

Happy anniversary!

Happy anniversary to the following very very important aspects of South Perth’s history! (There are so many more that we could celebrate but I thought I would just give you a snippet!)

120 years

  • On 9 June 1892, the South Perth Road Board was formed by taking its ‘suburban’ areas from the City of Perth.
  • The South Perth Road Board met for the first time on 19 September 1892.

110 years

  • South Perth became a municipality on 21 February 1902.

100 years

  • On 1 March 1912, the management of the Mends Street to Perth ferry service came under the WA Government.

90 years

  • South Perth became a road district on 1 March 1922.
  • On 5 August 1922, the East Perth – South Perth tram line (terminating Angelo Street & Labouchere Road) opened.

75 years

  • The opening of St Columba’s Church, Forrest Street, South Perth.
  • Canning Road (fmr Fremantle Road) became Canning Highway.

60 years

  • On 19 September 1952, the new Perth Causeway was completed.

30 years

  • Southcare was established in Manning.
  • On 9 May 1982 the Mt Henry Bridge opened.

Building of the week – Cygnet Theatre


The Cygnet Theatre was built in 1938 for James Stiles, owner of the Grand Theatre Company. The theatre was originally named Como Theatre but changed to Cygnet Theatre in the 1960’s to associate with the Festival of Perth’s black swan logo.

The building was designed by William Leighton and built by W.H. Ralph and Sons and originally had an adjacent outdoor picture garden. Leighton is also known for other cinemas such as the Piccadilly Theatre & Arcade in Perth, Windsor Theatre in Nedlands and Astor Theatre in Mt Lawley.

Gaiety Theatre (corner Coode and Angelo Street, established 1926) and Hurlingham Theatre (Canning Highway, established 1933) were still operating when Como Theatre opened. Como Theatre was the most modern and up-to-date cinema in the district, screening talkies for the first time.

The style of the theatre is inter-war functionalist with art deco influences. It is listed on the state register of heritage places administered by the Heritage Council of WA.