Lost Perth

Have you seen Perth’s latest craze on Facebook? Lost Perth is a page that attempts to uncover all the “lost” and “forgotten” photographs and memories of Perth.

The page was started by Warren Duffy less than 4 weeks ago and already has a whopping 54+ thousand “likes”.

An old scene from South Perth is currently featured on the page’s cover photo…
(Can you guess where that is? click on the image below for the answer)

Lost-Perth

And there have been other interesting photographs of South Perth’s history posted every few days.

Here are links to a few of them…

The Lost Perth page isn’t just interesting to us South Perthians however. This page will dredge up long forgotten memories from all over Perth. Read through the hundreds of comments and join the discussion and reminisce over the days gone by.

Seen or heard something interesting? Share it with us!

Advertisements

Piles of “stuff”

Sure, we all have ’em…piles of “stuff” – in the office, in the bedroom, in the spare room, in the car boot. You name it…

I have lots of piles of “stuff” in the Local History collection that were carefully arranged by a previous librarian or staff member. They had squirreled away fascinating documents and ephemera items in ‘safe spots’ or filed them away in an organisational system that only made sense to them. So now I am the lucky one who gets to sort through the “stuff” and make it accessible to you. Regardless of how time consuming it is, I always manage to uncover something exciting.

For example, the other day I discovered a poster that outlined the South Perth Road Board’s by-laws in regards to Public Parks & Reserves (believed to have been produced between 1922-1956, the second period during which the City was classified as a Road Board). One clause boldly stated something along the lines of ‘goats on leash are not permitted on any Park or Reserve within the boundaries of the South Perth Road Board’. I don’t think we would see too many leashed goats being taken for an afternoon walk around South Perth these days, but  in the early 20th century this could have been highly likely with the use of South Perth’s foreshores for agricultural purposes.

Yesterday I sat down with yet another pile of “stuff” and uncovered this little gem – a tramway time table for the ‘South Perth local service’ between Mends Street Jetty and Como. This could have been produced at any point between 1926-1950 (the Mends Street Tramway Extension was officially opened on 8 October 1926 and the tram service was discontinued on 10 June 1950. Also, Foy & Gibson’s Pty. Ltd. is in existence on Hay Street during this period, as are the offices for State Ferries and West Australian Government Tramways, situated at 514 Hay Street, Perth). It looks as though this is only half of the original time table (with evidence of tearing on the upper left corner of the passenger fares side). If I ever uncover the other half, I’ll be sure to share!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It’s wet & wooly in South Perth today…

I think we will all agree it’s pretty miserable weather across Perth today…

I think I maxed about 40 km/h along Labouchere Road this morning on my way to work…even though I was practically the only car going in that direction. The drainage (if there is any, wild guess here) along that road is pretty crummy so your car practically swims to where ever you are going.

South Perth had some wet & wooly times back in 1926, when the Peninsula area was flooded. Shoes and socks were taken off, and skirts and pants hitched up to cross the jetty to catch the ferry to Perth. Kids had a great time and got their rowboats out and went for a paddle down Suburban Road (now known as Mill Point Road).

Here’s hoping that the Como Beach foreshore is holding up OK!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Shenton’s Mill… aka …Old Mill

 

Shenton’s Mill (commonly known as the Old Mill) and cottage were built in 1835, replacing the 1833 timber-framed mill.  Shenton’s Mill ceased operation in 1859 due to the introduction of larger capacity steam mills to the Colony. After a brief period as a ‘Pleasure Garden’, during which time the sails were removed and verandahs and accommodation were added to the old tower, the Mill fell into decay.  It was rescued from demolition by Sir Lance Brisbane, who funded the preservation of the tower and cottage, transforming them into a folk museum.  The site was classified by the National Trust in 1973 and since 1994 has been managed and maintained by the City of South Perth.

The Old Mill is open to visitors Tuesday – Friday 10am – 4pm, Saturday and Sunday 1 pm – 4pm. Donations are greatfully accepted.

School and group visits are encouraged so give the Old Mill staff a call on 08 9367 5788 to let them know when you plan to visit.

Getting There…
The Mill is accessible via public transport- search the Transperth website for timetables.
Or if travelling by car on the Kwinana Freeway, take the Mill Point Road exit. The location of the Mill can be seen in the map below.

Manning Dairy

Mary and John Manning (Senior) arrived in Western Australiain 1852. They owned a considerable amount of property along Mounts Bay Road and established a dairy on the Perth side of Jacob’s Ladder.

With the fencing in of Kings Park and subsequent loss of grazing land, John Manning (Junior) moved some of the Mounts Bay herd to South Perth and began a dairy business c. 1877. Due to damage to the Causeway, John was required to cross the cattle at Heirrison Island where the water was shallow and there was a bank of oyster shell on the river bed extending over to the South Perth foreshore.

 John purchased 100 acres of property known as Location 38b on the South Perth foreshore for ten shillings an acre which came to be known as Southbourne. The Southbourne house was located on the corner of Hurlingham Street and Manning Terrace, and John cleared and cultivated the river front ground between Southbourne and Ellam Street, being ideal land for growing crops, pasture and vegetables.

The Manning and neighbouring Douglas dairy helped to supply Perthwith fresh milk.

John was interested in local affairs and was a member of the first South Perth Road Board formed 9 June 1892 and would continue to be Chairman of the Board in 1894, 1896-1897, 1899-1901 and the first Chairman of the South Perth Health Board formed 10 June 1897.